Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC

Recent research articles indexed in PubMed from authors affiliated with the UNT Health Science Center.

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term="University of North Texas Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "Univ. of North Texas Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "UNT Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "Osteopathic Research Center"[All Fields] OR "University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy"[All Fields] OR "UNT System College of Pharmacy"[All Fields] OR "College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas System"[All Fields]
Updated: 1 hour 46 min ago

Racial and ethnic differences in health behaviors among cancer survivors.

Fri, 10/07/2016 - 07:38
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Racial and ethnic differences in health behaviors among cancer survivors.

Am J Prev Med. 2015 Jun;48(6):729-36

Authors: Nayak P, Paxton RJ, Holmes H, Thanh Nguyen H, Elting LS

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Previous studies of health behaviors of adult cancer survivors have not adequately examined racial and ethnic differences because of small sample sizes. A national data set was used to examine differences in health behaviors between cancer survivors and controls and between racial and ethnic groups among survivors.
METHODS: The study analyzed 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data in 2012-2014. Descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in health behaviors between cancer survivors and controls aged 20-64 years. Multivariable analysis was conducted to examine associations between race/ethnicity (white, African American, Hispanic, Asian, or Native American) and health behaviors (BMI, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and smoking status) while adjusting for demographic and medical characteristics. Significance was set at p<0.01.
RESULTS: Compared with controls (n=245,283), cancer survivors (n=17,158) had higher prevalence rates for overweight/obese status (67% vs 65%); not meeting physical activity recommendations (53% vs 49%); and current smoking status (22% vs 20%). In the multivariable model, diet and smoking behavior differed across cancer status. African American (AOR=1.95) and Hispanic (AOR=2.06) survivors were more likely to have higher BMI than white survivors. African American survivors (AOR=1.6) were less likely to meet physical activity guidelines. Native American (AOR=3.08) and multiracial (AOR=1.74) survivors were more likely to be current smokers than non-Hispanic white survivors.
CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that racial and ethnic differences exist in the adoption of recommended health behaviors; future research should identify factors to reduce these differences.

PMID: 25998923 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Clinical response and relapse in patients with chronic low back pain following osteopathic manual treatment: results from the OSTEOPATHIC Trial.

Fri, 10/07/2016 - 07:38
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Clinical response and relapse in patients with chronic low back pain following osteopathic manual treatment: results from the OSTEOPATHIC Trial.

Man Ther. 2014 Dec;19(6):541-8

Authors: Licciardone JC, Aryal S

Abstract
Clinical response and relapse following a regimen of osteopathic manual treatment (OMT) were assessed in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) within the OSTEOPATHIC Trial, a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study. Initial clinical response and subsequent stability of response, including final response and relapse status at week 12, were determined in 186 patients with high baseline pain severity (≥50 mm on a 100-mm visual analogue scale). Substantial improvement in LBP, defined as 50% or greater pain reduction relative to baseline, was used to assess clinical response at weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12. Sixty-two (65%) patients in the OMT group attained an initial clinical response vs. 41 (45%) patients in the sham OMT group (risk ratio [RR], 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.90). The median time to initial clinical response to OMT in these patients was 4 weeks. Among patients with an initial clinical response prior to week 12, 13 (24%) patients in the OMT group vs. 18 (51%) patients in the sham OMT group relapsed (RR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26-0.83). Overall, 49 (52%) patients in the OMT group attained or maintained a clinical response at week 12 vs. 23 (25%) patients in the sham OMT group (RR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.36-3.05). The large effect size for short-term efficacy of OMT was driven by stable responders who did not relapse.

PMID: 24965494 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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