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Development and validation of a novel multiplexed DNA analysis system, InnoTyper(®) 21.

Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC - Mon, 04/10/2017 - 07:33
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Development and validation of a novel multiplexed DNA analysis system, InnoTyper(®) 21.

Forensic Sci Int Genet. 2017 Mar 18;29:80-99

Authors: Brown H, Thompson R, Murphy G, Peters D, La Rue B, King J, Montgomery AH, Carroll M, Baus J, Sinha S, Wendt FR, Song B, Chakraborty R, Budowle B, Sinha SK

Abstract
We report here a novel multiplexed DNA analysis system consisting of 20 Alu markers and Amelogenin for analysis of highly degraded forensic biological samples. The key to the success of the system in obtaining results from degraded samples is the primer design yielding small amplicon size (60-125bp) for all 20 markers. The markers included in the InnoTyper(®) 21 system are bi-allelic, having two possible allelic states (insertion or null) and thus termed INNULs. The markers are short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), a category of retrotransposable elements (REs) which are non-coding genomic DNA repeat sequences, or "mobile insertion elements," comprising approximately 40% of the human genome. Alu elements are primate specific SINEs that have reached a copy number in excess of one million in the human genome, which makes these markers highly sensitive and desirable for forensic samples with extremely degraded DNA. Until now however, due to the inherent size difference associated with insertion and no insertion alleles, the use of Alu REs has not been practical for forensic applications. The novel primer design described herein has allowed the development of a multiplexed Alu system yielding fragment sizes amenable to degraded DNA samples, as frequently encountered in missing persons cases or forensic samples such as hair shafts. Although use of Alus in human identity has been studied using single marker amplification and reported before, we report for the first time development and validation of a system with multiplexed RE markers. Studies performed include PCR optimization, species specificity, sensitivity, degradation and inhibition, precision and accuracy, nonprobative samples, mixture, and population database studies. A population study using 592 samples including five populations was performed using InnoTyper 21. The data indicated the random match probability for the combination of these 20 Alu markers was greater than 1 in 3.8 million for the populations studied, indicating the greater statistical power of these autosomal nuclear DNA markers over haplotype systems typically used in such degraded samples. Results demonstrate the system is successful in obtaining results from highly degraded DNA. A sensitivity study performed demonstrated at least 95% recovery of alleles from as low as 50pg of total input DNA, and partial profiles from as low as 25pg. This study has demonstrated that the bi-allelic INNULs in the InnoTyper 21 system provide a sensitivity of detection and a power of discrimination that makes them useful for human identification of extremely degraded samples.

PMID: 28391141 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Methylene blue inhibits GABAA receptors by interaction with GABA binding site.

Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC - Mon, 04/10/2017 - 07:33
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Methylene blue inhibits GABAA receptors by interaction with GABA binding site.

Neuropharmacology. 2017 Apr 05;:

Authors: Chen Z, Liu R, Yang SH, Dillon GH, Huang R

Abstract
Methylene blue (MB) is commonly used in diagnostic procedures and is also used to treat various medical conditions. Neurological effects of MB have been reported in clinical observations and experimental studies. Thus the modulation of GABAA receptor function by MB was investigated. Whole-cell GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK293 cells expressing various GABAA receptor subunit configurations. MB inhibition of GABA currents was apparent at 3 μM, and it had an IC50 of 31 μM in human α1β2γ2 receptors. The MB action was rapid and reversible. MB inhibition was not mediated via the picrotoxin site, as a mutation (T6'F of the β2 subunit) known to confer resistance to picrotoxin had no effect on MB-induced inhibition. Blockade of GABAA receptors by MB was demonstrated across a range of receptors expressing varying subunits, including those expressed at extrasynaptic sites. The sensitivity of α1β2 receptors to MB was similar to that observed in α1β2γ2 receptors, indicating that MB's action via the benzodiazepine or Zn(2+) site is unlikely. MB-induced inhibition of GABA response was competitive with respect to GABA. Furthermore, mutation of α1 F64 to A and β2 Y205 to F in the extracellular N-terminus, both residues which are known to comprise GABA binding pocket, remarkably diminished MB inhibition of GABA currents. These data suggest that MB inhibits GABAA receptor function by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA binding site. Finally, in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, MB inhibited GABA-activated currents as well as GABAergic IPSCs. We demonstrate that MB directly inhibits GABAA receptor function, which may underlie some of the effects of MB on the CNS.

PMID: 28390894 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Edoxaban: Defining place in therapy for the newest direct acting oral anticoagulant.

Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC - Mon, 04/10/2017 - 07:33
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Edoxaban: Defining place in therapy for the newest direct acting oral anticoagulant.

Am J Med. 2017 Apr 05;:

Authors: Gibson CM, Finks SW

Abstract
Edoxaban is the most recently approved factor Xa inhibitor within the class of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Like other DOACs, edoxaban was approved by the FDA for treatment of venous thromboembolism and prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Similar to other DOACs, edoxaban has fewer drug-drug interactions than warfarin and does not require routine laboratory monitoring. Unlike other DOACs, edoxaban has yet to be approved for secondary or postoperative venous thromboembolism thromboprophylaxis. Currently, no antidote for edoxaban is available. To optimally prescribe agents in the DOAC class, it is critical that providers 1) understand how the agents compare and 2) identify specific settings where one agent may be preferred over another.

PMID: 28390791 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Fluorescence properties of doxorubicin in PBS buffer and PVA films.

Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC - Sun, 04/09/2017 - 07:38

Fluorescence properties of doxorubicin in PBS buffer and PVA films.

J Photochem Photobiol B. 2017 Mar 30;170:65-69

Authors: Shah S, Chandra A, Kaur A, Sabnis N, Lacko A, Gryczynski Z, Fudala R, Gryczynski I

Abstract
We studied steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence properties of an anticancer drug Doxorubicin in a saline buffer and poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) film. Absorption of Doxorubicin, located at blue-green spectral region, allows a convenient excitation with visible light emitting diodes or laser diodes. Emission of Doxorubicin with maximum near 600nm can be easily detected with photomultipliers and CCD cameras. Both, absorption and fluorescence spectra in polymeric matrix show more pronounced vibronic structures than in solution. Also, the steady-state anisotropy in the polymer film is significantly higher than in the saline solution. In PVA film the fluorescence anisotropy is about 0.30 whereas in the saline buffer only 0.07. Quantum efficiencies of Doxorubicin were compared to a known standard Rhodamine 101 which has fluorescence emission in a similar spectral region. The quantum yield of Doxorubicin in PVA film is more than 10% and about twice higher than in the saline solution. Similarly, the lifetime of doxorubicin in PVA film is about 2ns whereas in the saline solution only about 1ns. The fluorescence anisotropy decays show that Doxorubicin molecules are freely rotating in the saline buffer with a correlation time of about 290ps, and are almost completely immobilized in the PVA film. The spectroscopic investigations presented in this manuscript are important, as they provide answers to changes in molecular properties of Doxorubicin depending changes in the local environment, which is useful when synthesizing nanoparticles for Doxorubicin entrapment.

PMID: 28390260 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Pyruvate preserves antiglycation defenses in porcine brain after cardiac arrest.

Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC - Sat, 04/01/2017 - 07:33

Pyruvate preserves antiglycation defenses in porcine brain after cardiac arrest.

Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2017 Jan 01;:1535370217703353

Authors: Scott GF, Nguyen AQ, Cherry BH, Hollrah RA, Salinas I, Williams AG, Ryou MG, Mallet RT

Abstract
Cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiocerebral resuscitation (CCR)-induced ischemia-reperfusion imposes oxidative and carbonyl stress that injures the brain. The ischemic shift to anaerobic glycolysis, combined with oxyradical inactivation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), provokes excessive formation of the powerful glycating agent, methylglyoxal. The glyoxalase (GLO) system, comprising the enzymes glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) and GLO2, utilizes reduced glutathione (GSH) supplied by glutathione reductase (GR) to detoxify methylglyoxal resulting in reduced protein glycation. Pyruvate, a natural antioxidant that augments GSH redox status, could sustain the GLO system in the face of ischemia-reperfusion. This study assessed the impact of CA-CCR on the cerebral GLO system and pyruvate's ability to preserve this neuroprotective system following CA. Domestic swine were subjected to 10 min CA, 4 min closed-chest CCR, defibrillation and 4 h recovery, or to a non-CA sham protocol. Sodium pyruvate or NaCl control was infused (0.1 mmol/kg/min, intravenous) throughout CCR and the first 60 min recovery. Protein glycation, GLO1 content, and activities of GLO1, GR, and GAPDH were analyzed in frontal cortex biopsied at 4 h recovery. CA-CCR produced marked protein glycation which was attenuated by pyruvate treatment. GLO1, GR, and GAPDH activities fell by 86, 55, and 30%, respectively, after CA-CCR with NaCl infusion. Pyruvate prevented inactivation of all three enzymes. CA-CCR sharply lowered GLO1 monomer content with commensurate formation of higher molecular weight immunoreactivity; pyruvate preserved GLO1 monomers. Thus, ischemia-reperfusion imposed by CA-CCR disabled the brain's antiglycation defenses. Pyruvate preserved these enzyme systems that protect the brain from glycation stress. Impact statement Recent studies have demonstrated a pivotal role of protein glycation in brain injury. Methylglyoxal, a by-product of glycolysis and a powerful glycating agent in brain, is detoxified by the glutathione-catalyzed glyoxalase (GLO) system, but the impact of cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiocerebral resuscitation (CCR) on the brain's antiglycation defenses is unknown. This study in a swine model of CA and CCR demonstrated for the first time that the intense cerebral ischemia-reperfusion imposed by CA-resuscitation disabled glyoxalase-1 and glutathione reductase (GR), the source of glutathione for methylglyoxal detoxification. Moreover, intravenous administration of pyruvate, a redox-active intermediary metabolite and antioxidant in brain, prevented inactivation of glyoxalase-1 and GR and blunted protein glycation in cerebral cortex. These findings in a large mammal are first evidence of GLO inactivation and the resultant cerebral protein glycation after CA-resuscitation, and identify novel actions of pyruvate to minimize protein glycation in postischemic brain.

PMID: 28361585 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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