Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC

Recent research articles indexed in PubMed from authors affiliated with the UNT Health Science Center.

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term="University of North Texas Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "Univ. of North Texas Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "UNT Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "Osteopathic Research Center"[All Fields] OR "University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy"[All Fields] OR "UNT System College of Pharmacy"[All Fields] OR "College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas System"[All Fields]
Updated: 1 hour 37 min ago

Tryptophan Fluorescence Yields and Lifetimes as a Probe of Conformational Changes in Human Glucokinase.

Sat, 09/22/2018 - 07:28
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Tryptophan Fluorescence Yields and Lifetimes as a Probe of Conformational Changes in Human Glucokinase.

J Fluoresc. 2017 Sep;27(5):1621-1631

Authors: Zelent B, Bialas C, Gryczynski I, Chen P, Chib R, Lewerissa K, Corradini MG, Ludescher RD, Vanderkooi JM, Matschinsky FM

Abstract
Five variants of glucokinase (ATP-D-hexose-6-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.1) including wild type and single Trp mutants with the Trp residue at positions 65, 99, 167 and 257 were prepared. The fluorescence of Trp in all locations studied showed intensity changes when glucose bound, indicating that conformational change occurs globally over the entire protein. While the fluorescence quantum yield changes upon glucose binding, the enzyme's absorption spectra, emission spectra and fluorescence lifetimes change very little. These results are consistent with the existence of a dark complex for excited state Trp. Addition of glycerol, L-glucose, sucrose, or trehalose increases the binding affinity of glucose to the enzyme and increases fluorescence intensity. The effect of these osmolytes is thought to shift the protein conformation to a condensed, high affinity form. Based upon these results, we consider the nature of quenching of the Trp excited state. Amide groups are known to quench indole fluorescence and amides of the polypeptide chain make interact with excited state Trp in the relatively unstructured, glucose-free enzyme. Also, removal of water around the aromatic ring by addition of glucose substrate or osmolyte may reduce the quenching.

PMID: 28432632 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The Pain Registry for Epidemiological, Clinical, and Interventional Studies and Innovation (PRECISION): registry overview and protocol for a propensity score-matched study of opioid prescribing in patients with low back pain.

Fri, 09/21/2018 - 07:29

The Pain Registry for Epidemiological, Clinical, and Interventional Studies and Innovation (PRECISION): registry overview and protocol for a propensity score-matched study of opioid prescribing in patients with low back pain.

J Pain Res. 2018;11:1751-1760

Authors: Licciardone JC, Gatchel RJ, Phillips N, Aryal S

Abstract
Background: Low back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended as the first-line pharmacologic therapy for subacute or chronic low back pain, with opioids reserved for patients who fail on NSAIDs. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 genes have variants that place patients using analgesics at risk for adverse events. However, precision medicine based on pharmacogenetically informed prescribing is becoming more feasible as genotyping costs decline. This study aims to compare opioids vs NSAIDs in treating adults with subacute or chronic low back pain under the alternative models of usual care and precision medicine.
Methods: An observational cohort study within the Pain Registry for Epidemiological, Clinical, and Interventional Studies and Innovation (PRECISION) will be used to simulate a randomized controlled trial. Patients using opioids and NSAIDs will be optimally matched at baseline using propensity scores. A saliva sample will also be collected to determine patient genotypes for drug metabolism based on CYP2D6 (single-gene model) and CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 (multigene model). Prescribing that is concordant with pharmacogenetically informed care under these models will be considered "low risk", whereas discordant prescribing will be considered "high risk". Primary outcomes will be assessed over 6 months using a Numerical Rating Scale for pain, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, and the Drug Adverse Events Index. Secondary outcomes will be assessed using quality-of-life measures. An estimated 600 patients will be enrolled to acquire at least 400 patients after attrition and allowing for unmatched patients. This will achieve a statistical power of at least 80% in detecting the effect sizes ranging from 0.35 (small-medium effect) to 0.69 (medium-large effect).
Discussion: This PRECISION Pain Research Registry study builds on the concepts espoused in the Precision Medicine Initiative and addresses long-term goals established by the National Institutes of Health by assessing how precision medicine may prevent and treat chronic pain.

PMID: 30233232 [PubMed]

Massively parallel sequencing of 12 autosomal STRs in Cannabis sativa.

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 07:28
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Massively parallel sequencing of 12 autosomal STRs in Cannabis sativa.

Electrophoresis. 2018 Sep 16;:

Authors: Houston R, Mayes C, King JL, Hughes-Stamm S, Gangitano D

Abstract
Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) is an emerging technology in the field of forensic genetics that provides distinct advantages compared to capillary electrophoresis CE. This study offers a proof of concept that MPS technologies can be applied to genotype autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) in Cannabis sativa. A custom panel for MPS was designed to interrogate 12 cannabis-specific STR loci by sequence rather than size. A simple workflow was implemented to integrate the custom PCR multiplex into a workflow compatible with the Ion Plus Fragment Library Kit, Ion™ Chef, and Ion™ S5 System. For data sorting and sequence analysis, a custom configuration file was designed for STRait Razor v3 to parse and extract STR sequence data. This study represents a preliminary investigation of sequence variation for 12 autosomal STR loci in 16 cannabis samples. Full concordance was observed between the MPS and CE data. Results revealed intra-repeat variation in eight loci where the nominal or size-based allele was identical, but variances were also discovered in the sequence of the flanking region. Although only a small number of cannabis samples were evaluated, this study demonstrates that more informative STR data can be obtained via MPS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 30221375 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Buffering chronic kidney disease with sodium bicarbonate.

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 07:28
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Buffering chronic kidney disease with sodium bicarbonate.

Clin Sci (Lond). 2018 Sep 14;132(17):1999-2001

Authors: Williams EN, Mathis KW

Abstract
The roles of the kidney are well defined, if there is a progressive loss in renal function, the kidney is no longer able to perform the listed tasks and chronic kidney disease (CKD) persists. In both clinical and experimental studies, NaHCO3 supplementation has been shown to improve glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as well as halt the progression toward end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In an article recently published in Clinical Science (vol 132 (11) 1179-1197), Ray et al. presented an intriguing and timely study, which investigates the mechanisms involved in the protection that follows oral NaHCO3 ingestion. Here we comment on their research findings.

PMID: 30220653 [PubMed - in process]

American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Clinical Consensus Statement: Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult Acquired Infracalcaneal Heel Pain.

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 07:28
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American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Clinical Consensus Statement: Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult Acquired Infracalcaneal Heel Pain.

J Foot Ankle Surg. 2018 Mar - Apr;57(2):370-381

Authors: Schneider HP, Baca JM, Carpenter BB, Dayton PD, Fleischer AE, Sachs BD

Abstract
Adult acquired inferior calcaneal heel pain is a common pathology seen in a foot and ankle practice. A literature review and expert panel discussion of the most common findings and treatment options are presented. Various diagnostic and treatment modalities are available to the practitioner. It is prudent to combine appropriate history and physical examination findings with patient-specific treatment modalities for optimum success. We present the most common diagnostic tools and treatment options, followed by a discussion of the appropriateness of each based on the published data and experience of the expert panel.

PMID: 29284574 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Presence of Androgen Receptor Variant in Neuronal Lipid Rafts.

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 07:28
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Presence of Androgen Receptor Variant in Neuronal Lipid Rafts.

eNeuro. 2017 Jul-Aug;4(4):

Authors: Garza-Contreras J, Duong P, Snyder BD, Schreihofer DA, Cunningham RL

Abstract
Fast, nongenomic androgen actions have been described in various cell types, including neurons. However, the receptor mediating this cell membrane-initiated rapid signaling remains unknown. This study found a putative androgen receptor splice variant in a dopaminergic N27 cell line and in several brain regions (substantia nigra pars compacta, entorhinal cortex, and hippocampus) from gonadally intact and gonadectomized (young and middle-aged) male rats. This putative splice variant protein has a molecular weight of 45 kDa and lacks an N-terminal domain, indicating it is homologous to the human AR45 splice variant. Interestingly, AR45 was highly expressed in all brain regions examined. In dopaminergic neurons, AR45 is localized to plasma membrane lipid rafts, a microdomain involved in cellular signaling. Further, AR45 protein interacts with membrane-associated G proteins Gαq and Gαo. Neither age nor hormone levels altered AR45 expression in dopaminergic neurons. These results provide the first evidence of AR45 protein expression in the brain, specifically plasma membrane lipid rafts. AR45 presence in lipid rafts indicates that it may function as a membrane androgen receptor to mediate fast, nongenomic androgen actions.

PMID: 28856243 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Electronic cigarette explosion and burn injuries, US Emergency Departments 2015-2017.

Mon, 09/17/2018 - 07:29
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Electronic cigarette explosion and burn injuries, US Emergency Departments 2015-2017.

Tob Control. 2018 Sep 15;:

Authors: Rossheim ME, Livingston MD, Soule EK, Zeraye HA, Thombs DL

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) battery failure can result in explosions and burn injuries. Previous attempts to quantify these events has been limited to compilations of case studies, federal agency reports and media reports. Although e-cigarette explosions and burn injuries are thought to be rare, current surveillance methods likely underestimate actual occurrences.
METHODS: Analyses were conducted on cross-sectional data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). A keyword search of case narrative text was used to identify e-cigarette-related explosion and burn injuries presenting to US emergency departments from 2015 to 2017. Sampling weights were applied to make conservative national incidence estimates.
RESULTS: From 2015 to 2017, there were an estimated 2035 e-cigarette explosion and burn injuries presenting to US hospital emergency departments (95% CI 1107 to 2964).
CONCLUSIONS: There are more e-cigarette explosion and burn injuries in the USA than estimated in the past reports. Improved surveillance of e-cigarette injuries and regulation of e-cigarette devices is urgently needed. NEISS could be a valuable resource for e-cigarette injury surveillance.

PMID: 30219795 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Food Choice Priorities Change Over Time and Predict Dietary Intake at the End of the First Year of College Among Students in the U.S.

Sun, 09/16/2018 - 07:29
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Food Choice Priorities Change Over Time and Predict Dietary Intake at the End of the First Year of College Among Students in the U.S.

Nutrients. 2018 Sep 13;10(9):

Authors: Vilaro MJ, Colby SE, Riggsbee K, Zhou W, Byrd-Bredbenner C, Olfert MD, Barnett TE, Horacek T, Sowers M, Mathews AE

Abstract
This study assessed food choice priorities (FCP) and associations with consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), fiber, added sugars from non-beverage sources, and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) among college students. Freshmen from eight U.S. universities (N = 1149) completed the Food Choice Priorities Survey, designed for college students to provide a way to determine the factors of greatest importance regarding food choices, and the NCI Dietary Screener Questionnaire. Changes in FCP and dietary intake from fall 2015 to spring 2016 were assessed. Multiple regression models examined associations between FCP and log-transformed dietary intake, controlling for sex, age, race, and BMI. Participant characteristics and FCP associations were also assessed. FCP importance changed across the freshmen year and significantly predicted dietary intake. The most important FCP were price, busy daily life and preferences, and healthy aesthetic. Students who endorsed healthy aesthetic factors (health, effect on physical appearance, freshness/quality/in season) as important for food choice, consumed more FV and fiber and less added sugar and SSB. Busy daily life and preferences (taste, convenience, routine, ability to feel full) predicted lower FV, higher added sugar, and higher SSB consumption. Price predicted lower FV, higher SSB, and more added sugar while the advertising environment was positively associated with SSB intake. FCP and demographic factors explained between 2%⁻17% of the variance in dietary intake across models. The strongest relationship was between healthy aesthetic factors and SSB (B = -0.37, p < 0.01). Self-rated importance of factors influencing food choice are related to dietary intake among students. Interventions that shift identified FCP may positively impact students' diet quality especially considering that some FCP increase in importance across the first year of college.

PMID: 30217004 [PubMed - in process]

Comparing methods of misclassification correction for studies of adolescent alcohol use.

Sat, 09/15/2018 - 07:29
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Comparing methods of misclassification correction for studies of adolescent alcohol use.

Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2018;44(2):160-166

Authors: Livingston MD, Cannell B, Muller K, Komro KA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Despite concerns over measurement error, self-report continues to be the most common measure of adolescent alcohol use used by researchers. Objective measures of adolescent alcohol use continue to advance; however, they tend to be cost prohibitive for larger studies. By combining appropriate statistical techniques and validation subsamples, the benefits of objective alcohol measures can be made more accessible to a greater number of researchers.
OBJECTIVES: To compare three easily implemented methods to correct for measurement error when objective measures of alcohol use are available for a subsample of participants, regression calibration, multiple imputation for measurement error (MIME), and probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA), and provide guidance regarding the use of each method in scenarios likely to occur in practice.
METHODS: This simulation experiment compared the performance of each method across different sample sizes, both differential and non-differential error, and differing levels of sensitivity and specificity of the exposure measure.
RESULTS: Failure to adjust for measurement error led to substantial bias across all simulated scenarios ranging from a 35% to 208% change in the log-odds. For non-differential misclassification, regression calibration reduced this bias to between a 1% and 23% change in the log-odds regardless of sample size. At higher sample sizes, MIME produced approximately unbiased (between a 0% and 9% change in the log-odds) and relatively efficient corrections for both non-differential and differential misclassification. PSA provided little utility for correcting misclassification due to the inefficiency of its estimates.
CONCLUSION: Concern over measurement error resulting from self-reported adolescent alcohol use persists in research. Where appropriate, methods involving validity subsamples provide an efficient avenue for addressing these concerns.

PMID: 29451414 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Association between emergency physician self-reported empathy and patient satisfaction.

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 07:29
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Association between emergency physician self-reported empathy and patient satisfaction.

PLoS One. 2018;13(9):e0204113

Authors: Wang H, Kline JA, Jackson BE, Laureano-Phillips J, Robinson RD, Cowden CD, d'Etienne JP, Arze SE, Zenarosa NR

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Higher physician self-reported empathy has been associated with higher overall patient satisfaction. However, more evidence-based research is needed to determine such association in an emergent care setting.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between physician self-reported empathy and after-care instant patient-to-provider satisfaction among Emergency Department (ED) healthcare providers with varying years of medical practice experience.
RESEARCH DESIGN: A prospective observational study conducted in a tertiary care hospital ED.
METHODS: Forty-one providers interacted with 1,308 patients across 1,572 encounters from July 1 through October 31, 2016. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) was used to assess provider empathy. An after-care instant patient satisfaction survey, with questionnaires regarding patient-to-provider satisfaction specifically, was conducted prior to the patient moving out of the ED. The relation between physician empathy and patient satisfaction was estimated using risk ratios (RR) and their corresponding 95% confidence limits (CL) from log-binomial regression models.
RESULTS: Emergency Medicine (EM) residents had the lowest JSE scores (median 111; interquartile range [IQR]: 107-122) and senior physicians had the highest scores (median 119.5; IQR: 111-129). Similarly, EM residents had the lowest percentage of "very satisfied" responses (65%) and senior physicians had the highest reported percentage of "very satisfied" responses (69%). There was a modest positive association between JSE and satisfaction (RR = 1.04; 95% CL: 1.00, 1.07).
CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence of a positive association between ED provider self-reported empathy and after-care instant patient-to-provider satisfaction. Overall higher empathy scores were associated with higher patient satisfaction, though minor heterogeneity occurred between different provider characteristics.

PMID: 30212564 [PubMed - in process]

Pharmacokinetics and Optimal Dosing of Phenobarbital.

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 07:29
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Pharmacokinetics and Optimal Dosing of Phenobarbital.

Pediatr Neurol Briefs. 2018 Sep 05;32:7

Authors: Shareef S, Ali MN

Abstract
Researchers from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX, USA, conducted a retrospective population pharmacokinetic analysis of 355 patients ages less than 19 years of age in the inpatient setting who were initiated on intravenous or oral phenobarbital therapy and had one or more serum phenobarbital concentrations sampled.

PMID: 30210229 [PubMed]

Maximizing Benefits With the Medication Use Evaluation Process.

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 07:29
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Maximizing Benefits With the Medication Use Evaluation Process.

Hosp Pharm. 2018 Oct;53(5):284-285

Authors: Davis S, Rungruangphol PD, Gibson CM

PMID: 30210143 [PubMed]

Correction to: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Disturbs Coronary Tone and Its Regulatory Mechanisms.

Thu, 09/13/2018 - 07:29
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Correction to: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Disturbs Coronary Tone and Its Regulatory Mechanisms.

Cell Mol Neurobiol. 2018 Sep 11;:

Authors: Lazuko SS, Kuzhel OP, Belyaeva LE, Manukhina EB, Downey HF, Tseilikman OB, Komelkova MV, Tseilikman VE

Abstract
The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake in the co-author name.

PMID: 30206749 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Effects of creatine supplementation on nociception in young male and female mice.

Thu, 09/13/2018 - 07:29
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Effects of creatine supplementation on nociception in young male and female mice.

Pharmacol Rep. 2018 Apr;70(2):316-321

Authors: Izurieta Munoz H, Gonzales EB, Sumien N

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to evaluate creatine as an anti-nociceptive compound in an animal model of thermal and inflammatory pain. Creatine has the structural potential to interact with acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC), which have been involved in pain sensation modulation. The hypothesis evaluated in this study was that creatine will interact with ASICs leading to decreased nociception.
METHODS: Male and female C57BL/6J mice were fed with either a control diet or the control diet supplemented with creatine (6.25 g/kg diet). After one week on the diet, the mice were tested for thermal hyperalgesia and inflammatory pain response.
RESULTS: The latency to withdraw the tail during the thermal hyperalgesia test was unaffected by sex or diet. During the formalin test, males and females responded differently to the stimulus, and the female mice supplemented with creatine seemed to recover faster than the controls. To determine whether ASICs mediate the action of creatine, GMQ, an ASIC3 agonist, was injected in one paw and pain response was quantified. Females responded more strongly to GMQ injections, and all mice fed creatine had a decreased response to GMQ.
CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary data suggest a potential effect of creatine on inflammation-based nociception that may be mediated via ASIC3. While preliminary, this study warrants further research on the potential of creatine as an analgesic and can serve as a stepping stone for the development of ASIC-based therapeutics.

PMID: 29477040 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Treatment duration affects cytoprotective efficacy of positive allosteric modulation of α7 nAChRs after focal ischemia in rats.

Wed, 09/12/2018 - 07:29
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Treatment duration affects cytoprotective efficacy of positive allosteric modulation of α7 nAChRs after focal ischemia in rats.

Pharmacol Res. 2018 Sep 08;:

Authors: Gaidhani N, Uteshev VV

Abstract
To minimize irreversible brain injury after acute ischemic stroke (AIS), the time to treatment (i.e., treatment delay) should be minimized. However, thus far, all cytoprotective clinical trials have failed. Analysis of literature identified short treatment durations (≤72 h) as a common motif among completed cytoprotective clinical trials. Here, we argue that short cytoprotective regimens even if given early after AIS may only slow down the evolution of ischemic brain injury and fail to deliver sustained long-term solutions leading to relapses that may be misinterpreted for conceptual failure of cytoprotection. In this randomized blinded study, we used young adult male rats subjected to transient 90 min suture middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and treated with acute vs. sub-chronic regimens of PNU120596, a prototypical positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with anti-inflammatory cytoprotective properties to test the hypothesis that insufficient treatment durations may reduce therapeutic benefits of otherwise efficacious cytoprotectants after AIS. A single acute treatment 90 min after MCAO significantly reduced brain injury and neurological deficits 24 h later, but these effects vanished 72 h after MCAO. These relapses were avoided by utilizing sub-chronic treatments. Thus, extending treatment duration augments therapeutic efficacy of PNU120596 after MCAO. Furthermore, sub-chronic treatments could offset the negative effects of prolonged treatment delays in cases where the acute treatment window after MCAO was left unexploited. We conclude that a combination of short treatment delays and prolonged treatment durations may be required to maximize therapeutic effects of PNU120596, reduce relapses and ensure sustained therapeutic efficacy after AIS. Similar concepts may hold for other cytoprotectants including those that failed in clinical trials.

PMID: 30205140 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Estimated blood alcohol concentrations achieved by consuming supersized alcopops.

Wed, 09/12/2018 - 07:29
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Estimated blood alcohol concentrations achieved by consuming supersized alcopops.

Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2018;44(3):317-320

Authors: Rossheim ME, Thombs DL

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Producers of supersized alcopops have ignored requests from a number of state attorneys general to reduce the alcohol concentration in these products. To the contrary, new flavor options have since been released that contain even greater alcohol content so that some alcopop products now contain 5.5 standard alcoholic drinks in a single-serving can. Though alcohol content of supersized alcopops has risen, little attention has been paid to the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level consumers can expect to achieve from drinking these products.
OBJECTIVES: To estimate BAC levels expected from consuming one or two cans of supersized alcopop, relative to beer.
METHODS: Median weight data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used in Matthews and Miller's (1979) BAC estimation formula.
RESULTS: Consuming a single supersized alcopop over the course of 2 hours can put youth and young adults well over the legal per se driving limit of 0.08 g/dL. Consuming two cans puts them at risk of alcohol poisoning.
CONCLUSIONS: Estimates provided here show that supersized alcopop consumers obtain dangerously high BAC levels. Reductions in the alcohol content of supersized alcopops should be an urgent priority for public health policy and law.

PMID: 28605266 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

A Precision Medicine Model for Targeted NSAID Therapy in Alzheimer's Disease.

Tue, 09/11/2018 - 07:29
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A Precision Medicine Model for Targeted NSAID Therapy in Alzheimer's Disease.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2018 Sep 04;:

Authors: O'Bryant SE, Zhang F, Johnson LA, Hall J, Edwards M, Grammas P, Oh E, Lyketsos CG, Rissman RA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date, the therapeutic paradigm for Alzheimer's disease (AD) focuses on a single intervention for all patients. However, a large literature in oncology supports the therapeutic benefits of a precision medicine approach to therapy. Here we test a precision-medicine approach to AD therapy.
OBJECTIVE: To determine if a baseline, blood-based proteomic companion diagnostic predicts response to NSAID therapy.
METHODS: Proteomic assays of plasma from a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial, with 1-year exposure to rofecoxib (25 mg once daily), naproxen (220 mg twice-daily) or placebo.
RESULTS: 474 participants with mild-to-moderate AD were screened with 351 enrolled into the trial. Using support vector machine (SVM) analyses, 89% of the subjects randomized to either NSAID treatment arms were correctly classified using a general NSAID companion diagnostic. Drug-specific companion diagnostics yielded 98% theragnostic accuracy in the rofecoxib arm and 97% accuracy in the naproxen arm.
CONCLUSION: Inflammatory-based companion diagnostics have significant potential to identify select patients with AD who have a high likelihood of responding to NSAID therapy. This work provides empirical support for a precision medicine model approach to treating AD.

PMID: 30198872 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

How to Fix the Dangerous Lack of Clinical Pharmacology Education in the Medical Profession: The Generation of Core Entrustable Professional Activities in Clinical Pharmacology for Entering Residency.

Tue, 09/11/2018 - 07:29
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How to Fix the Dangerous Lack of Clinical Pharmacology Education in the Medical Profession: The Generation of Core Entrustable Professional Activities in Clinical Pharmacology for Entering Residency.

J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 10;56(10):1177-9

Authors: Donnenberg VS, Burris JF, Wiernik PH, Cohen LJ, Korth-Bradley JM

PMID: 27068769 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The Importance of Authentic Leadership to all Generations Represented within Academic Pharmacy.

Thu, 09/06/2018 - 07:29
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The Importance of Authentic Leadership to all Generations Represented within Academic Pharmacy.

Am J Pharm Educ. 2018 Aug;82(6):6694

Authors: Pinelli NR, Sease JM, Nola K, Kyle JA, Heldenbrand SD, Penzak SR, Ginsburg DB

Abstract
Academic pharmacy spans several generations including traditionalists, baby boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y, commonly referred to as millennials. It has been suggested that leadership styles must change to accommodate these generational differences in academic pharmacy, yet there are no data of which we are aware, that support this assertion. We contend that leadership styles are derived from one's authentic self and are based on core beliefs and values; therefore, leadership styles must not change to accommodate a specific generation or other subset of academic pharmacy. Instead, effective leaders must change tactics (ie, methods or processes) to reach and influence a specific cohort. This article develops and supports the argument that leadership styles should not change to accommodate generational differences in academic pharmacy.

PMID: 30181676 [PubMed - in process]

Role and Possible Mechanisms of Sirt1 in Depression.

Thu, 09/06/2018 - 07:29
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Role and Possible Mechanisms of Sirt1 in Depression.

Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2018;2018:8596903

Authors: Lu G, Li J, Zhang H, Zhao X, Yan LJ, Yang X

Abstract
Depression is a common, devastating illness. Due to complicated causes and limited treatments, depression is still a major problem that plagues the world. Silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1) is a deacetylase at the consumption of NAD+ and is involved in gene silencing, cell cycle, fat and glucose metabolism, cellular oxidative stress, and senescence. Sirt1 has now become a critical therapeutic target for a number of diseases. Recently, a genetic study has received considerable attention for depression and found that Sirt1 is a potential gene target. In this short review article, we attempt to present an up-to-date knowledge of depression and Sirt1 of the sirtuin family, describe the different effects of Sirt1 on depression, and further discuss possible mechanisms of Sirt1 including glial activation, neurogenesis, circadian control, and potential signaling molecules. Thus, it will open a new avenue for clinical treatment of depression.

PMID: 29643977 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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