Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC

Recent research articles indexed in PubMed from authors affiliated with the UNT Health Science Center.

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term="University of North Texas Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "Univ. of North Texas Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "UNT Health Science Center"[All Fields] OR "Osteopathic Research Center"[All Fields] OR "University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy"[All Fields] OR "UNT System College of Pharmacy"[All Fields] OR "College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas System"[All Fields]
Updated: 2 hours 31 min ago

Fluorescence lifetime imaging with time-gated detection of hyaluronidase using a long lifetime azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore.

Tue, 02/14/2017 - 07:32

Fluorescence lifetime imaging with time-gated detection of hyaluronidase using a long lifetime azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore.

Methods Appl Fluoresc. 2016 Nov 17;4(4):047001

Authors: Chib R, Requena S, Mummert M, Strzhemechny YM, Gryczynski I, Borejdo J, Gryczynski Z, Fudala R

Abstract
A fluorescence lifetime imaging probe with a long lifetime was used in combination with time-gating for the detection of hyaluronidase using hyaluronic acid as the probe template. This probe was developed by heavily labeling hyaluronic acid with long lifetime azadioxatriangulenium fluorophores (ADOTA). We used this probe to image hyaluronidase produced by DU-145 prostate cancer cells.

PMID: 28192308 [PubMed - in process]

Skeletal Muscle Function Deficits in the Elderly: Current Perspectives on Resistance Training.

Tue, 02/14/2017 - 07:32
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Skeletal Muscle Function Deficits in the Elderly: Current Perspectives on Resistance Training.

J Nat Sci. 2017 Jan;3(1):

Authors: Papa EV, Dong X, Hassan M

Abstract
A variety of changes in skeletal muscle occur with aging. Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of muscle mass and is one of the main contributors to musculoskeletal impairments in the elderly. Traditional definitions of sarcopenia focused on the size of human skeletal muscle. However, increasing evidence in older adults suggests that low muscle mass is associated with weakness, and weakness is strongly associated with function and disability. In recent years a global trend has shifted toward more encompassing definitions for the loss of muscle mass which include decreases in physical function. This review focuses on skeletal muscle function deficits in the elderly and how these age-associated deficits can be ameliorated by resistance training. We set forth evidence that skeletal muscle deficits arise from changes within the muscle, including reduced fiber size, decreased satellite cell and fiber numbers, and decreased expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform IIa. Finally, we provide recommendations for clinical geriatric practice regarding how resistance training can attenuate the increase in age-associated skeletal muscle function deficits. Practitioners should consider encouraging patients who are reluctant to exercise to move along a continuum of activity between "no acticity" on one end and "recommended daily amounts" on the other.

PMID: 28191501 [PubMed - in process]

Effects of intermittent pressure imitating rolling manipulation on calcium ion homeostasis in human skeletal muscle cells.

Tue, 02/14/2017 - 07:32
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Effects of intermittent pressure imitating rolling manipulation on calcium ion homeostasis in human skeletal muscle cells.

BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016 Aug 26;16(1):314

Authors: Zhang H, Liu H, Lin Q, Zhang G, Mason DC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Homeostasis imbalance of intracellular Ca(2+) is one of the key pathophysiological factors in skeletal muscle injuries. Such imbalance can cause significant change in the metabolism of Ca(2+)-related biomarkers in skeletal muscle, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA) and creatine kinase (CK). Measurements of these biomarkers can be used to evaluate the degree of damage to human skeletal muscle cells (HSKMCs) injury. Rolling manipulation is the most popular myofascial release technique in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The mechanism of how this technique works in ameliorating muscle injury is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the possible Ca(2+) mediated effects of intermittent pressure imitating rolling manipulation (IPIRM) of Traditional Chinese Medicine in the injured HSKMCs.
METHODS: The normal HSKMCs was used as control normal group (CNG), while the injured HSKMCs were further divided into five different groups: control injured group (CIG), Rolling manipulation group (RMG), Rolling manipulation-Verapamil group (RMVG), static pressure group (SPG) and static pressure-Verapamil group (SPVG). RMG and RMVG cells were cyclically exposed to 9.5-12.5 N/cm(2) of IPIRM at a frequency of 1.0 Hz for 10 min. SPG and SPVG were loaded to a continuous pressure of 12.5 N/cm(2) for 10 min. Verapamil, a calcium antagonist, was added into the culture mediums of both RMVG and SPVG groups to block the influx of calcium ion.
RESULT: Compared with the CNG (normal cells), SOD activity was remarkably decreased while both MDA content and CK activity were significantly increased in the CIG (injured cells). When the injured cells were treated with the intermittent rolling manipulation pressure (RMG), the SOD activity was significantly increased and MDA content and CK activity were remarkably decreased. These effects were suppressed by adding the calcium antagonist Verapamil into the culture medium in RMVG. On the other hand, exposure to static pressure in SPG and SPVG affected neither the SOD activity nor the MDA content and CK activity in the injured muscle cells regardless of the presence of verapamil or not in the culture medium.
CONCLUSION: These data suggest that the intermittent rolling pressure with the manipulation could ameliorate HSKMCs injury through a Ca(2+) dependent pathway. Static pressure did not lead to the same results.

PMID: 27561948 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Activation of the sigma-1 receptor by haloperidol metabolites facilitates brain-derived neurotrophic factor secretion from human astroglia.

Sun, 02/12/2017 - 07:47

Activation of the sigma-1 receptor by haloperidol metabolites facilitates brain-derived neurotrophic factor secretion from human astroglia.

Neurochem Int. 2017 Feb 08;:

Authors: Dalwadi DA, Kim S, Schetz JA

Abstract
Glial cells play a critical role in neuronal support which includes the production and release of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Activation of the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) has been shown to attenuate inflammatory stress-mediated brain injuries, and there is emerging evidence that this may involve a BDNF-dependent mechanism. In this report we studied S1R-mediated BDNF release from human astrocytic glial cells. Astrocytes express the S1R, which mediates BDNF release when stimulated with the prototypical S1R agonists 4-PPBP and (+)-SKF10047. This effect could be antagonized by a selective concentration of the S1R antagonist BD1063. Haloperidol is known to have high affinity interactions with the S1R, yet it was unable to facilitate BDNF release. Remarkably, however, two metabolites of haloperidol, haloperidol I and haloperidol II (reduced haloperidol), were discovered to facilitate BDNF secretion and this effect was antagonized by BD1063. Neither 4-PPBP, nor either of the haloperidol metabolites affected the level of BDNF mRNA as assessed by qPCR. These results demonstrate for the first time that haloperidol metabolites I and II facilitate the secretion of BDNF from astrocytes by acting as functionally selective S1R agonists.

PMID: 28188803 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Transethnic genome-wide scan identifies novel Alzheimer's disease loci.

Sun, 02/12/2017 - 07:47
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Transethnic genome-wide scan identifies novel Alzheimer's disease loci.

Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Feb 06;:

Authors: Jun GR, Chung J, Mez J, Barber R, Beecham GW, Bennett DA, Buxbaum JD, Byrd GS, Carrasquillo MM, Crane PK, Cruchaga C, De Jager P, Ertekin-Taner N, Evans D, Fallin MD, Foroud TM, Friedland RP, Goate AM, Graff-Radford NR, Hendrie H, Hall KS, Hamilton-Nelson KL, Inzelberg R, Kamboh MI, Kauwe JS, Kukull WA, Kunkle BW, Kuwano R, Larson EB, Logue MW, Manly JJ, Martin ER, Montine TJ, Mukherjee S, Naj A, Reiman EM, Reitz C, Sherva R, St George-Hyslop PH, Thornton T, Younkin SG, Vardarajan BN, Wang LS, Wendlund JR, Winslow AR, Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium, Haines J, Mayeux R, Pericak-Vance MA, Schellenberg G, Lunetta KL, Farrer LA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Genetic loci for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been identified in whites of European ancestry, but the genetic architecture of AD among other populations is less understood.
METHODS: We conducted a transethnic genome-wide association study (GWAS) for late-onset AD in Stage 1 sample including whites of European Ancestry, African-Americans, Japanese, and Israeli-Arabs assembled by the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium. Suggestive results from Stage 1 from novel loci were followed up using summarized results in the International Genomics Alzheimer's Project GWAS dataset.
RESULTS: Genome-wide significant (GWS) associations in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based tests (P < 5 × 10(-8)) were identified for SNPs in PFDN1/HBEGF, USP6NL/ECHDC3, and BZRAP1-AS1 and for the interaction of the APOE ɛ4 allele with NFIC SNP. We also obtained GWS evidence (P < 2.7 × 10(-6)) for gene-based association in the total sample with a novel locus, TPBG (P = 1.8 × 10(-6)).
DISCUSSION: Our findings highlight the value of transethnic studies for identifying novel AD susceptibility loci.

PMID: 28183528 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol-like effects of novel synthetic cannabinoids in mice and rats.

Sun, 02/12/2017 - 07:47
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Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol-like effects of novel synthetic cannabinoids in mice and rats.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2016 05;233(10):1901-10

Authors: Gatch MB, Forster MJ

Abstract
RATIONALE: Novel cannabinoid compounds continue to be marketed as "legal" marijuana substitutes, even though little is known about their molecular and behavioral effects.
OBJECTIVES: Six of these compounds (ADBICA, ADB-PINACA, THJ-2201, RCS-4, JWH-122, JWH-210) were tested for in vitro and in vivo cannabinoid-like effects to determine their abuse liability.
METHODS: Binding to and functional activity at CB1 cannabinoid receptors was tested. Locomotor activity in mice was tested to screen for behavioral activity and to identify behaviorally active dose ranges and times of peak effect. Discriminative stimulus effects of the six compounds were tested in rats trained to discriminate Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC).
RESULTS: ADBICA, ADB-PINACA, THJ-2201, RCS-4, JWH-122, and JWH-210 showed high affinity binding at the CB1 receptor at nanomolar affinities (0.59 to 22.5 nM), and all acted as full agonists with nanomolar potencies (0.024 to 111 nM) when compared to the CB1 receptor full agonist CP 55940. All compounds depressed locomotor activity below 50 % of vehicle responding, with depressant effects lasting 1.5 to nearly 4 h. All compounds fully substituted (<80 % Δ(9)-THC-appropriate responding) for the discriminative stimulus effects of Δ(9)-THC. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) was tested as a negative control and did not substitute for Δ(9)-THC (11 % Δ(9)-THC-appropriate responding).
CONCLUSIONS: All six of the compounds acted at the CB1 receptor and produced behavioral effects common to abused cannabinoid compounds, which suggest that these compounds have substantial abuse liability common to controlled synthetic cannabinoid compounds.

PMID: 26875756 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Can ceftazidime/avibactam and aztreonam overcome β-lactam resistance conferred by metallo-β-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae?

Thu, 02/09/2017 - 07:34
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Can ceftazidime/avibactam and aztreonam overcome β-lactam resistance conferred by metallo-β-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae?

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2017 Feb 06;:

Authors: Marshall S, Hujer AM, Rojas LJ, Papp-Wallace KM, Humphries RM, Spellberg B, Hujer KM, Marshall EK, Rudin SD, Perez F, Wilson BM, Wasserman RB, Chikowski L, Paterson DL, Vila AJ, van Duin D, Kreiswirth BN, Chambers HF, Fowler VG, Jacobs MR, Pulse ME, Weiss WJ, Bonomo RA

Abstract
Based upon knowledge of the hydrolytic profile of major β-lactamases found in Gram negative bacteria, we tested the effectiveness of the combination of ceftazidime/avibactam (CAZ/AVI) with aztreonam (ATM) against carbapenem-resistant enteric bacteria possessing metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). Disk-diffusion and agar based antimicrobial susceptibility testing were initially performed to determine the in vitro efficacy of a unique combination of CAZ/AVI and ATM against 21 representative Enterobacteriaceae isolates with a complex molecular background that included blaIMP, blaNDM, blaOXA-48, blaCTX-M, blaAmpC, and combinations thereof. Time-kill assays were conducted, and the in vivo efficacy of this combination was assessed in a murine neutropenic thigh infection model. By disk diffusion assay, all 21 isolates were resistant to CAZ/AVI alone, and 19/21 were resistant to ATM. The in vitro activity of CAZ/AVI in combination with ATM against diverse Enterobacteriaceae possessing MBLs was demonstrated in 17/21 isolates, where the zone of inhibition was ≥ 21 mm. All isolates demonstrated a reduction in CAZ/AVI agar dilution MICs with the addition of ATM. At 2 h, time-kill assays demonstrated a ≥ 4 log10 CFU decrease for all groups that had CAZ/AVI plus ATM (8 μg/ml) added, compared to the CAZ/AVI alone group. In the murine neutropenic thigh infection model, an almost 4 log10 reduction in CFUs was noted at 24 h for CAZ/AVI (32 mg/kg q8h) plus ATM (32 mg/kg q8h) vs. CAZ/AVI (32 mg/kg q8h) alone. The data presented herein, requires us to carefully consider this new therapeutic combination to treat infections caused by MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

PMID: 28167541 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Dexamethasone-Induced Ocular Hypertension in Mice: Effects of Myocilin and Route of Administration.

Thu, 02/09/2017 - 07:34
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Dexamethasone-Induced Ocular Hypertension in Mice: Effects of Myocilin and Route of Administration.

Am J Pathol. 2017 Feb 03;:

Authors: Patel GC, Phan TN, Maddineni P, Kasetti RB, Millar JC, Clark AF, Zode GS

Abstract
Glucocorticoid (GC)-induced ocular hypertension (OHT) is a serious adverse effect of prolonged GC therapy that can lead to iatrogenic glaucoma and permanent vision loss. An appropriate mouse model can help us understand precise molecular mechanisms and etiology of GC-induced OHT. We therefore developed a novel, simple, and reproducible mouse model of GC-induced OHT. GC-induced myocilin expression in the trabecular meshwork (TM) has been suggested to play an important role in GC-induced OHT. We further determined whether myocilin contributes to GC-OHT. C57BL/6J mice received weekly periocular conjunctival fornix injections of a dexamethasone-21-acetate (DEX-Ac) formulation. Intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation was relatively rapid and significant, and correlated with reduced conventional outflow facility. Nighttime IOPs were higher in ocular hypertensive eyes compared to daytime IOPs. DEX-Ac treatment led to increased expression of fibronectin, collagen I, and α-smooth muscle actin in the TM in mouse eyes. No changes in body weight indicated no systemic toxicity associated with DEX-Ac treatment. Wild-type mice showed increased myocilin expression in the TM on DEX-Ac treatment. Both wild-type and Myoc(-/-) mice had equivalent and significantly elevated IOP with DEX-Ac treatment every week. In conclusion, our mouse model mimics many aspects of GC-induced OHT in humans, and we further demonstrate that myocilin does not play a major role in DEX-induced OHT in mice.

PMID: 28167045 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Correlation of Lipid Profile and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in 10-14 Year Old Children.

Thu, 02/09/2017 - 07:34
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Correlation of Lipid Profile and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in 10-14 Year Old Children.

Cell Physiol Biochem. 2016;39(5):1695-1704

Authors: Habiba NM, Fulda KG, Basha R, Shah D, Fernando S, Nguyen B, Xiong Y, Franks SF, Matches SJ, Magie RD, Bowman WP

Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The role of lipid profile in predicting the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children is not clearly established. Our aim is to screen non-diabetic children aged 10-14 years for risk of developing T2DM and evaluate the association of abnormal lipids and socioeconomic status (SES).
METHODS: Data on race/ethnicity, family history, body mass index percentile, blood pressure and presence of neck pigmentation (acanthosis nigricans) were collected from 149 non-diabetic children. Using these factors, children were classified into low risk (<3 risk factors) and high risk (>3 risk factors) groups. Logistic regression model and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association of blood lipid profile and demographic variables. Independent t-test was used to compare the ratio of Total Cholesterol (TC) and High Density Lipids (HDL) with T2DM risk.
RESULTS: 60% of children were at high risk for developing T2DM. HDL (p<0.001), triglycerides (p=0.02) and TC/HDL ratio (p<.001) were significantly abnormal in high risk group. Low SES showed a marginal association with high risk group. There were no gender or age differences between high and low risk groups.
CONCLUSIONS: The significant determinants associated with high risk group were modifiable factors providing an opportunity for early intervention and prevention.

PMID: 27642750 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Role of RAGE in Alzheimer's Disease.

Tue, 02/07/2017 - 07:32
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Role of RAGE in Alzheimer's Disease.

Cell Mol Neurobiol. 2016 May;36(4):483-95

Authors: Cai Z, Liu N, Wang C, Qin B, Zhou Y, Xiao M, Chang L, Yan LJ, Zhao B

Abstract
Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a receptor of the immunoglobulin super family that plays various important roles under physiological and pathological conditions. Compelling evidence suggests that RAGE acts as both an inflammatory intermediary and a critical inducer of oxidative stress, underlying RAGE-induced Alzheimer-like pathophysiological changes that drive the process of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A critical role of RAGE in AD includes beta-amyloid (Aβ) production and accumulation, the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, failure of synaptic transmission, and neuronal degeneration. The steady-state level of Aβ depends on the balance between production and clearance. RAGE plays an important role in the Aβ clearance. RAGE acts as an important transporter via regulating influx of circulating Aβ into brain, whereas the efflux of brain-derived Aβ into the circulation via BBB is implemented by LRP1. RAGE could be an important contributor to Aβ generation via enhancing the activity of β- and/or γ-secretases and activating inflammatory response and oxidative stress. However, sRAGE-Aβ interactions could inhibit Aβ neurotoxicity and promote Aβ clearance from brain. Meanwhile, RAGE could be a promoting factor for the synaptic dysfunction and neuronal circuit dysfunction which are both the material structure of cognition, and the physiological and pathological basis of cognition. In addition, RAGE could be a trigger for the pathogenesis of Aβ and tau hyper-phosphorylation which both participate in the process of cognitive impairment. Preclinical and clinical studies have supported that RAGE inhibitors could be useful in the treatment of AD. Thus, an effective measure to inhibit RAGE may be a novel drug target in AD.

PMID: 26175217 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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