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The Essential Role of Neutrophils during Infection with the Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC - Tue, 08/01/2017 - 17:06
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The Essential Role of Neutrophils during Infection with the Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

J Immunol. 2016 Sep 01;197(5):1557-65

Authors: Witter AR, Okunnu BM, Berg RE

Abstract
Neutrophils have historically been characterized as first responder cells vital to host survival because of their ability to contain and eliminate bacterial and fungal pathogens. However, recent studies have shown that neutrophils participate in both protective and detrimental responses to a diverse array of inflammatory and infectious diseases. Although the contribution of neutrophils to extracellular infections has been investigated for decades, their specific role during intracellular bacterial infections has only recently been appreciated. During infection with the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, neutrophils are recruited from the bone marrow to sites of infection where they use novel bacterial-sensing pathways leading to phagocytosis and production of bactericidal factors. This review summarizes the requirement of neutrophils during L. monocytogenes infection by examining both neutrophil trafficking and function during primary and secondary infection.

PMID: 27543669 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism - A Cohort Study.

Recent Research Articles from UNTHSC - Sun, 07/30/2017 - 07:33
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Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism - A Cohort Study.

Sci Rep. 2017 Jul 28;7(1):6754

Authors: Chang CH, Yeh YC, Caffrey JL, Shih SR, Chuang LM, Tu YK

Abstract
Prior cross-sectional analyses have demonstrated an association between subclinical hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome and selected components. However, the temporal relation between metabolic syndrome and declining thyroid function remains unclear. In a prospective study, an unselected cohort of 66,822 participants with and without metabolic syndrome were followed. A proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for hypothyroidism. Exploratory analyses for the relation between components of metabolic syndrome and declining thyroid function were also undertaken. During an average follow-up of 4.2 years, the incident rates for subclinical hypothyroidism were substantially higher in participants who began the study with metabolic syndrome compared with metabolically normal controls. After controlling for risk factors, patients with metabolic syndrome were at a 21% excess risk of developing subclinical hypothyroidism (adjusted HR 1.21; 95% CI 1.03-1.42). When individual components were analyzed, an increased risk of subclinical hypothyroidism was associated with high blood pressure (1.24; 1.04-1.48) and high serum triglycerides (1.18; 1.00-1.39), with a trend of increasing risk as participants had additional more components. Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at a greater risk for developing subclinical hypothyroidism, while its mechanisms and temporal consequences of this observation remain to be determined.

PMID: 28754977 [PubMed - in process]

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